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The Tythe Pig: C.735-1928

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Object information

Current Location: In storage

Titles

The Tythe Pig

Maker(s)

Possibly Unidentified Staffordshire factory (Factory)
Possibly Unidentified Liverpool factory (Factory)

Description

Lead-glazed creamware transfer-printed in black with ‘The Tythe Pig’ and accompanying verse.

Cream-coloured earthenware, lead-glazed and transfer-printed onglaze in black using the glue bat method. The cylindrical mug has a loop handle. Opposite the handle is a print a man and woman standing together in front of farm buildings. The man has a dog by his side and holds a stick in his right hand and a pig in his left. The woman holds a small child. Turning away from the couple is a vicar. Beside him is a peacock and behind him a church. In front of the figures are sheaves of wheat, apples, pears and baskets of fruit. Beneath the image are the title - ‘The TYTHE PIG’ - and a verse divided into two columns. The first column reads: ‘In Country Village lives a Vicar / Fond – as all are - of Tythes and Liquor; / To Mirth his Ears are seldom shut, / He’ll Crack a Joke, and laugh at smut, / But when he Tythes he gathers in, / True Parson then - no Coin, no Grin; / On Fish, on Flesh, on Bird, on Beast, / Alike lays hold the Chulish Priest.’ The second column reads: ‘Hob’s Wife and sow – as Gossips tell / Both at a time in Pieces fell; / The Parson comes, the Pig he claims, / And the Good Wife with Taunts inflames; / But she, quite Arch, bow’d low and smil’d, / Kept back the Pig, and held the Child; / The Priest look’d gruff, the Wife look’d big, / Z…d Sir! quoth she, no Child, no Pig.’

Notes

History note: Provenance unknown before William Turner, Esq., Purley Chase, Atherstone, Warwickshire; Turner sold to Mr Stoner, London, who then sold for £3 on 14 March 1911 to Dr J.W.L. Glaisher, FRS, Trinity College, Cambridge

Legal notes

Dr J.W.L. Glaisher Bequest.

Measurements and weight

Height: 15 cm
Width: 15 cm

Relative size of this object

15 cm15 cm What does this represent?

Relative size of this object is displayed using code inspired by Good Form and Spectacle's work on the British Museum's Waddeson Bequest website and their dimension drawer. They chose a tennis ball to represent a universally sized object, from which you could envisage the size of an object.

Place(s) associated

  • Liverpool ⪼ Staffordshire ⪼ England

Acquisition and important dates

Method of acquisition: Bequeathed (1928-12-07) by Glaisher, J. W. L., Dr

Dating

Late 18th century
George III
Circa 1780 CE - Circa 1790 CE

Note

The transfer print on the jug is derived from a print published in London in 1751, drawn by Louis Phillipe Boitard and engraved by Johann Sebastian Müller. Although the print on the jug varies a few of the details of Boitard’s image, such as the buildings in the background, the inscription beneath is copied exactly. Boitard’s print was designed as a satire of the greed of the clergy. The print and inscription describe a not-so-pious parson who enjoys drink and smutty jokes and gets his comeuppance when he comes to claim a pig as tythe from a farmer’s wife: she insists that if he wants the pig, he must also take her child; the parson then turns away in distaste. The ‘Tythe Pig’ print was very popular throughout the second half of the 18th-century, a time when satirical and humorous prints were an common form of entertainment; some print-makers even published sequels to it, showing the greedy parson returning to try and claim the pig again, only to be outfoxed by the sow herself!

Transfer printing was introduced to English pottery in the second half of the 18th century. Most early transfer-printed ware used the glue bat method. In this method, the design was engraved on a copper plate, which was then covered with linseed oil. The thin bat of animal glue was pressed onto the oiled plate and then applied to the ware. Once the bat was removed, the ware was dusted with powdered metallic oxide, which adhered to the oil, and fired to fix the design. This method was common for round-bodied vessels like this mug because the flexible glue bat can easily stretch round curving body.

Components of the work

Base Diameter 10.5 cm
Body

Materials used in production

black Ceramic printing colour cream coloured Earthenware Lead-glaze

Techniques used in production

Transfer printing Lead-glazing

Inscription or legends present

  • Text: “The TYTHE PIG”
  • Location: Under the image on the front of the mug
  • Method of creation: Transfer-printed onglaze in black
  • Type: Inscription
  • Text: In Country Village lives a Vicar / Fond - as all are - of Tythes and Liquor; / To Mirth his Ears are seldom shut, / He’ll Crack a Joke, and laugh at smut, / But when he Tythes he gathers in, / True Parson then - no Coin, no Grin; / On Fish, on Flesh, on Bird, on Beast, / Alike lays hold the Chulish Priest. / Hob’s Wife and sow - as Gossips tell / Both at a time in Pieces fell; / The Parson comes, the Pig he claims, / And the Good Wife with Taunts inflames; / But she, quite Arch, bow’d low and smil’d, / Kept back the Pig, and held the Child; / The Priest look’d gruff, the Wife look’d big, / Z…d Sir! quoth she, no Child, no Pig.
  • Location: Under the image on the front of the mug
  • Method of creation: Transfer-printed onglaze in black
  • Type: Inscription

Inscription present: stick-on octagonal white paper stick on label with red border

  • Text: No 3382 Large mug of Leeds/cream ware with/picture ‘The Tythe/Pig’ and verses. From the W. Turner/Collection. b. March 14, 1911.
  • Location: On base
  • Method of creation: Handwritten in black ink
  • Type: Label

References and bibliographic entries

Identification numbers

Accession number: C.735-1928
Primary reference Number: 75950
Old catalogue number: 3382
Stable URI

Audit data

Created: Saturday 6 August 2011 Updated: Wednesday 15 July 2020 Last processed: Monday 25 July 2022

Associated departments & institutions

Owner or interested party: The Fitzwilliam Museum
Associated department: Applied Arts

Citation for print

This record can be cited in the Harvard Bibliographic style using the text below:

The Fitzwilliam Museum (2022) "The Tythe Pig" Web page available at: https://data.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/id/object/75950 Accessed: 2022-08-14 04:11:36

Citation for Wikipedia

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{{cite web|url=https://data.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/id/object/75950 |title=The Tythe Pig |author=The Fitzwilliam Museum|accessdate=2022-08-14 04:11:36|publisher=The University of Cambridge}}

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https://data.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/api/v1/objects/object-75950

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        <figcaption class="figure-caption text-info">The Tythe Pig</figcaption>
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